KAT SUPERFISKY

making the world a more beautiful place

analysis

Refined Residential Design-Build: Rain Garden + Shoreline Plantings

Posted By on 14 April 2013 in analysis, design process, native planting, site planning + planting design, stormwater mitigation, technical skills |

Refined Residential Design-Build: Rain Garden + Shoreline Plantings

I thought having my parents as clients would make the process of designing a native rain garden and shoreline habitat simpler and less stressful. I was wrong. Come to find out, proposing the removal of sacred suburban front lawn in order to make room for a rain garden planted with “messy” looking native plants posed quite a challenge, and required a significant amount of collaboration and design iteration, until the perfect blend of environmentally sensitive AND aesthetically appealing design came to fruition. I presented...

Canyons in the City: Urban Redevelopment Master Plan for Ypsilanti, MI

Posted By on 13 April 2013 in analysis, landscape planning + design, models |

Canyons in the City: Urban Redevelopment Master Plan for Ypsilanti, MI

A 32 acre site sits vacant in the heart of the City of Ypsilanti, Michigan, waiting to be re-imagined and re-invested in. The City of Ypsilanti’s Planning Department approached landscape architects at the University of Michigan for assistance developing a Master Plan that would feed life back into this “Water Street” area.   Site Context + Analysis Water Street is primly located along the Huron River, which cuts through the City of Ypsilanti and provides recreational opportunities for residents. This location makes the site a...

Management, Access + Education Plan for Mud Lake Bog

Posted By on 12 April 2013 in analysis, conceptual design, landscape planning + design |

Management, Access + Education Plan for Mud Lake Bog

Mud Lake Bog is a unique 250-acre collection of natural communities in southeast MI that is owned and managed by the University of Michigan (U-M). To the south of U-M’s property is Independence Lake County Park (ILCP), a 312-acre multi-use facility with dry-mesic forests, remnant prairies, Independence Lake, and various other outdoor recreational opportunities and facilities. Together, this contiguous 562-acre pocket of green space has the potential to serve a large number of urban, suburban, and rural residents in the densely-populated Metro Detroit area,...

Stretching the Status Quo: Native Garden Design for a Campus Building

Posted By on 10 April 2013 in analysis, native planting, site planning + planting design |

Stretching the Status Quo: Native Garden Design for a Campus Building

The Samuel T. Dana Building is a Gold LEED-rated building on the University of Michigan’s Central Campus. Home to the School of Natural Resources and Environment (SNRE) this facility seeks to educate about the importance of the environment–not only to students enrolled in the School, but also the greater community. One way that SNRE does so is by taking education outdoors, and maintaining a native garden in front of the building, rather than the standard grass lawn. Being planted back in the early 2000’s,...

Landscape Sustainability + Usability Consulting Project for the U-M Biological Station

Posted By on 7 April 2013 in analysis, conceptual design, landscape planning + design, native planting, stormwater mitigation |

Landscape Sustainability + Usability Consulting Project for the U-M Biological Station

The University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) is one of the most blissful places on Earth. Located on the shores of Douglas Lake, in northern Michigan, this 118 acre satellite campus has provided students, staff, and faculty with spring and summer opportunities to take courses and conduct research for the past 100 years. After teaching an Environmental Planning during the summer of 2011, I realized how much assistance the Station could use from the perspective of a landscape architect. The campus landscape is minimally...

6 Ways to Skin a Site Analysis…

Posted By on 6 April 2013 in analysis, technical skills |

6 Ways to Skin a Site Analysis…

The first step(s) to any solid design is analysis. It’s essential to identify current site conditions, assets, uses, etc in order to inform and deliver the most fitting design. Analysis comes in the form of site visits used for sketching, photographing, and getting a feel for the sights, smells, and character of a site; technical GIS analysis of a site’s soils, topography, hydrology, demographics, etc; sun-shade analyses; on-site soil testing and surveying; online research; and even talking to folks who know or live in...